Talking to Kids About Plastic Surgery

Talking to Kids About Plastic Surgery

With an increase in both "mommy makeovers" and male cosmetic surgery procedures, a lot of parents are going under the knife these days. But while the change in your appearance may be a welcome change to you and maybe even your partner- it may not be as easily embraced by your children. If you’re struggling to figure out how to tell your kids that you’ll be changing your look, or if they know and are having fear or anxiety about your upcoming or recent surgery, here are a few tips to help explain your decision to them, and hopefully ease some of that stress, too.

How do I tell my children I’m having surgery without them getting scared?

Telling your kid you’re about to have major surgery can be very scary- for you and for them. While it is recommended that you discuss what is about to happen with them, depending on their age there are varying degrees of detail you should give them about the procedure. For preschool aged children and younger, telling them that mom or dad are going to see the doctor so they can feel better about themselves is a great, vague way to summarize what’s about to happen. Nothing in their lives is changing, you will just be happier with how you look, and after you heal, you’ll feel better, too.

 

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Warning: Confidence Boost on the Job May Occur

Warning: Confidence Boost on the Job May Occur

It probably comes as little surprise that plastic surgery can have a positive effect on your self-esteem. Correcting an issue with your appearance can do wonders for how you feel about the person staring back at you in the mirror- but did you know that when it comes to cosmetic procedures, self-esteem is just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak? Studies have shown that in addition to the boost in self-esteem and confidence most patients notice post-surgery, there are some other surprising benefits you may not have even thought about! Dr. Ryan Mitchell shares some surprising new findings.

In 2013, when researchers at the University of Melbourne surveyed 121 patients at prominent local plastic surgery clinics, they weren’t sure what to expect. They knew that plastic surgery would likely improve the self-esteem of their respondents, but they were surprised to find that it also improved their job satisfaction, too! Why job satisfaction, though? The answers might surprise you!

 

In the study, published in Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, researchers Alicia Kalus and Christina Cregan found that patients returning to work after surgery experienced not only higher levels of job satisfaction, but lower levels of job-related burnout than they did prior to their surgery. Kalus and Cregan theorize that in addition to benefitting from a deeper sense of self-esteem which boosted the overall happiness of the post-op patients, the responding patients also benefitted from a boost in what Kalus and Cregan refer to as a "beauty premium." This theory states that beautiful people are said to be treated better in the workplace (and in society) than those deemed less attractive. This is also known as an "attractiveness bias," and it has been shown to unwittingly cause employers to overestimate the confidence they have in an employee’s abilities, based solely on their appearance. In other words, the study respondents’ employers may have -whether correctly or incorrectly- believed their newly-refreshed employee was capable of more challenging work following their surgical procedure!

Ultimately, the most positive finding in this study was that patients returning to work had a more positive outlook on life and their job. This means that even if nothing else changed for the majority of the responding patients meaning their employers’ opinions didn’t change, and did not afford their employees the benefit of an attractiveness bias or beauty premium- the patient’s own boost in inner-happiness had enough of a positive effect in the patient’s job-life that it helped the patient view their job in a more positive light!

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More Plastic Surgery Procedures Using Stomach Fat

More Plastic Surgery Procedures Using Stomach Fat

Stomach fat. Many of us have it, but it’s pretty safe to say that none of us want it. But now, this famously stubborn and hard-to-lose deposit of body fat has found a role that might finally give it a little respect: as a plastic surgery filler. We spoke to Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, Nevada about why an increasing number of plastic surgeons are using stomach fat as a surgical filler.

It’s called ‘fat grafting’- the procedure where a surgeon takes fat from one area of your body, and then injects that fat into another area of the body that is lacking in volume. The fat can be taken from the buttocks, thighs, hips, and increasingly, from the stomach. The grafted fat can then be transferred elsewhere in the body, such as the lips, breasts or buttocks. This benefits the patient in many ways- most notably because by grafting fat that was already part of the patient’s body, the surgeon is not introducing anything new or unnatural to the body. This increases the likelihood of the body "accepting" the fat transfer, it also looks and feels more natural than injecting synthetic materials would. There are of course some downsides to fat grafting, but according to Mitchell, those downsides are minimal.

"Unlike with synthetic fillers, fat grafting requires a bit more downtime following the procedure," Mitchell said. "This is because the fat first has to be harvested from the patient’s body via liposuction, so it’s not as simple as opening a container of Botox and sending the patient on their way."

Fat grafting is a two-step process, first the extraction, and then the injection. In some cases, the extraction may require local or general anesthesia, depending on where the fat is taken from, and how much fat is taken during the procedure.  

In the second step, the fat is then injected into another area of the body. Again, the anesthesia and recovery will depend on where the fat is grafted to. For patients using it as facial fillers, they may not require as much downtime as someone who is getting their fat grafted to the breasts or buttocks. Furthermore, because fat is a natural substance and thus less predictable than a synthetic like Botox or Juvederm, it is considered less stable

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Red Hot Trend Alert: Venus Dimples

Red Hot Trend Alert: Venus Dimples

You could have them already- those two little dents where your lower back meets your buttocks, commonly known as ‘Venus dimples.’ But while many people probably have never given them more than a passing glance, Venus dimples are on track to be the number one new trend in plastic surgery for 2017, thanks to their increasing popularity from bikini shots of models and Instagram-celebrities like the Hadid sisters, Kylie Jenner and Miranda Kerr. We spoke to Henderson, Nevada plastic surgeon Dr. Ryan Mitchell about this popular new procedure.

Venus dimples get their name from the Roman Goddess of Beauty. When naturally occurring, Venus dimples are two sagittally symmetrical indentations on the lower back that appear at the site of the two sacroiliac joints, where the sacrum and ilium of the pelvis connect. Venus dimples contain a channel of veins that is often used as a guide in spinal surgery- specifically in procedures to place sacral pedicle screws in the spine. They are also said to increase blood circulation in the pelvic area and are believed to enhance sexual pleasure in those who possess them.

But now there’s good news for women who don’t have Venus dimples, but would like to have them- there’s a trendy new plastic surgery procedure called the "V-spot treatment" that can create the look of these trendy dents- and women are paying up to $5,000 for it!  Named for the diamond-shaped area of the lower back, the v-spot procedure uses a cannula to break up the fat on the lower back and basically carve the ‘v’ shape, and two indentations into the body, explains Mitchell. The broken-up body fat is then suctioned up by the cannula, and after about two weeks of minor pain and discomfort, even patients who weren’t born with Venus dimples can look like they were. According to Mitchell, recovery from the v-spot procedure is relatively easy.

"Patients who undergo v-spot surgery can expect some minor discomfort for the first few days following the surgery, and may find relief in wearing a compression garment during the first few weeks of recovery, but most pain generally subsides within a few days," Mitchell said. 

The good news, and perhaps, for some, the bad news, is that Venus dimples are genetic- you either have them, or you don’t. For those who have them, they’re present no matter what shape you’re in- though carrying extra weight may make them harder to see. For those patients, a v-spot procedure can still help to make the Venus dimples more defined, so just because you already have them doesn’t mean you can’t make them deeper. For those looking to improve the appearance of their entire lower back area, according to Mitchell, v-spot surgery can be done at the time of other procedures, such as liposuction or the recent favorite, the Brazilian butt-lift.

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The Greater Las Vegas Area is a Plastic Surgery Travel Destination

The Greater Las Vegas Area is a Plastic Surgery Travel Destination

You’ve probably heard that salacious marketing motto, ‘What happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas.’ Coined in 2003 as part of a Las Vegas tourism campaign, the phrase (and campaign) took off like wildfire, creating some of the most memorable commercials in recent history- and inspiring everything from songs to major motion pictures. Designed to invoke feelings of both freedom from inhibition, to privacy in the form of an unspoken brotherhood-like ‘code,’ that everyone in the area knows and abides by. So it’s not surprising at all that people around the world are flocking to the greater Las Vegas area, and to Mitchell Plastic Surgery, for their plastic surgery procedures.

 

Destination plastic surgery, or surgery vacations, are not a new concept. For years we’ve been hearing about patients booking travel to foreign countries for "cheap" or "affordable" plastic surgery procedures. These controversial trips have been long-discouraged by board-certified doctors and federal agencies for decades. Leaving the US for surgery poses significant risks- especially if the practitioner performing the surgery is not board-certified, or worse. Many travel surgery horror stories have ended with patients learning post-surgery that their surgeon wasn’t even a licensed doctor- usually, after something has gone horribly wrong. Botched surgeries can cause everything from severe infection to permanent scarring, disfigurement, and in some cases, even death of the patient. So, it’s no wonder that the trend of domestic, board-certified, destination surgery is on the incline.

The Greater-Las Vegas area boasts many benefits for booking your destination surgery. For example, our high concentration of board-certified plastic surgeon offers several benefits to the patient. First, because there is so much competition, prices and package deals designed to save you money over local competitors are everywhere. Furthermore, with so many surgeons to choose from, you have the freedom to choose someone who specializes in the specific procedure you’re considering. Another way the patient benefits from the friendly competition between surgeons is the need for surgeons to stay on the ‘cutting edge’ of plastic and cosmetic surgery procedures. In order to stay competitive, your surgeon must keep adding new procedures, products, and techniques to his portfolio- or risk losing patients to someone down the street who knows more or offers more.

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What Are the Most Requested Celebrity Faces?

What Are the Most Requested Celebrity Faces?

In a society that is seemingly obsessed with celebrity culture, the desire to look more like a specific celebrity is surprisingly, perfectly healthy. After all, who wouldn’t want to share features with an extremely beautiful person? But did you know that in addition to being a totally normal behavior, for patients seeking plastic surgery, paying attention to celebrity features can actually be very useful in identifying what you do and do not want to change with your own features? If you’ve ever caught yourself staring at a magazine or television show, wishing you had Angelina’s lips or Kerry Washington’s cheekbones, you’re not alone.

 

Each year, patients around the US seek the assistance of plastic surgeons, armed with photos of their favorite actors, musicians, and models for inspiration. This practice is not only extremely common, but it’s also extremely useful to your surgeon, too. In addition to helping your surgeon identify current trends in the beauty world, your facial or body inspiration also helps your surgeon use those trends to improve the options for other patients who may not know how exactly to voice which changes they are seeking. For example, when a lot of people come in requesting a specific celebrity’s nose, your surgeon gets better at recreating that look. He can turn to the next patient who isn’t sure what he or she wants and say "a lot of patients like this look," which could help inspire the patient to narrow their focus.

With the rise in popularity of male plastic surgery, more male patients are requesting to look like celebrities, too. In fact, a recently compiled list of trends is showing surgeons exactly what faces men admire, and which features they wish to change on their own faces. Topping this year’s list of most popular male faces is New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, whose overall face, and more specifically his cheekbones, are in high demand among male patients. Not surprisingly, the most popular facial plastic surgery procedure among men is a cheek lift.  Other male favorites include Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson’s strong jawline, and other features from actors Chris Hemsworth, Chris Pratt, and John Hamm, as well as male supermodels Sean O’Pry and Tyson Beckford.

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Breastfeeding and Implants: What You Need to Know

Breastfeeding and Implants: What You Need to Know

Have you ever considered breast implants, but held off because you hoped to breastfeed your baby someday? Have you already gotten implants, but aren’t sure if breastfeeding is safe- or even possible? A recent study may offer some hope to patients considering nursing with implants. We asked plastic surgeon Dr. Ryan Mitchell for some clarification.

 

You may have heard the rumor floating around that it’s not possible to breastfeed a baby after having breast implants placed- but according to a study published in the December issue of the medical journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, that’s one rumor that is mostly untrue. The study was conducted by researchers at Sanatorio de la Mujer and Centro Quirúrgico Rosario in Rosario, Argentina, and followed 200 new mothers who planned to breastfeed their newborns. Of those 200 subjects, 100 had implants, 100 did not. Of the 100 women in the group without implants, 99% successfully breastfed their babies after one month. Of the 100 women with implants, a surprising 93% successfully breastfed after the first month as well.

Even more fascinating was the discovery that the type of incision used to insert the breast implant had no effect on the subject’s breastfeeding success rate. Says Mitchell "It has been long believed by many surgeons that women with submammary incisions have a better chance of breastfeeding successfully than women with periareolar incisions- but this study has found that to be untrue as well." 

As for those women who are concerned that breastfeeding will cause their implants to sag or become damaged, there’s good news for them, too.  An unrelated study conducted in 2013 by researchers at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine in San Juan, PR found that breastfeeding had no effect on breasts with or without implants- though according to Mitchell, pregnancy itself still may change the breast. "Breastfeeding gets a bad rap for changing the breast tissue, but it’s actually the pregnancy hormones responsible for breast changes- not the breastmilk."  So, what’s a woman who want’s it all supposed to do? "If you already have implants and would like to nurse your baby, the odds are in your favor," says Mitchell. "If you’re considering getting implants and don’t want to wait until someday when you may or may not have a baby, there’s no reason to put off a breast augmentation right now. But if you’re planning on getting pregnant in the next few years, it might be better to wait if you’re concerned about the effects of pregnancy on your body." For those who currently have implants and do notice a difference in their breasts post-pregnancy, Mitchell offers this reminder "Breast implants weren’t meant to stay in the body for the rest of your life. You eventually will need an update surgery, so if you’re unhappy with how pregnancy has changed your augmentation, it’s definitely correctable when you update your implants. That’s something you should absolutely mention to your surgeon."

Trendy Ear Piercings May Come at an Unexpected Cos... What Are the Most Requested Celebrity Faces?
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Trendy Ear Piercings May Come at an Unexpected Cost

Trendy Ear Piercings May Come at an Unexpected Cost

If you’ve ever seen an earlobe piercing with an enlarged opening and a large silver hoop lining the inside of that opening, then you’ve seen the trendy piercing known as a "flesh tunnel." Though flesh tunnels are becoming increasingly popular today, they date back to ancient times, where they were used as a sign of wealth and status in tribes throughout Asia and Africa.

 

Gauging one’s ears is the process of stretching out the lobes to accommodate a flesh tunnel. Gauging works by inserting a wide bar (called a gauge, plug, or spacer) into a piercing to stretch the opening. As the hole in their ear grows, the gauge is replaced with a larger sized gauge, until the desired size is reached. Gauges typically run the range from .8mm to all the way up to 50mm (2 inches), but they can often get much bigger- in fact, he Guinness World Record for the largest piercing is 109mm or 4.3 inches! But while the wearers of these piercings think they look cool now, what happens when they grow tired of wearing them- or they must accept a job that requires the piercings to be removed? While the skin of the ear has some inherent elasticity, there is no way to heal a 2" piercing without intervention. This very dilemma has given rise to a new form of plastic surgery:  earlobe reconstruction.  We spoke to Henderson, NV plastic surgeon Dr. Ryan Mitchell about what patients can expect from this increasingly popular procedure.

Youth is a time of rebellion, adventure, and figuring out who you are. For many young people, It’s also the first time out on their own, away from the watchful eye of caregivers, and usually without the responsibility of a 9-5 job. It's also the perfect time to do something wild with your appearance, like shave your head, get a tattoo, or yes- stretch your ears out with gauges. But while most of these acts of rebellion are either temporary or at very least, easy to hide, ear gauges are neither- a fact that many young people don’t seem to realize or aren’t bothered by-  until it’s too late.

We asked Mitchell if he’s noticed an uptick in patients requesting earlobe reconstruction surgery. "Yes, absolutely," he says "Many patients who seek this surgery were surprised to discover just how little their ears closed up without intervention. Unfortunately, I think many of the people getting gauges are either misinformed, or they just don’t think far enough into the future."  After all, circumstances change, and life has a way of throwing a monkey wrench into your plans. Mitchell says patients have cited everything from new jobs, to change of style, to even just frustration with the piercings getting in the way of daily life as reasons for wanting to surgically correct their earlobes. "Inconvenience can be a major factor," he explains "You may not realize how often your hands, phone, or clothing touch your ears each day."

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Sun Protection Isn’t Seasonal

Sun Protection Isn’t Seasonal

It wasn’t all that long ago that tanning was thought to be safe, and having a tan was described as having a ‘healthy glow.’  Nowadays, we know how dangerous tanning is (yes, even in tanning beds!), and for the most part, American’s have swapped their bottles of tanning oil for SPF 15.  But did you know that the harmful UV rays that make tanning so dangerous are present year-round- even on the coldest or cloudiest of days? In fact, it only takes about 15 minutes of sun exposure to get a sunburn. That’s about how long it takes to take your dog for a walk, and eleven minutes less than the average American’s commute to work! Don’t think because you’re in your car you’re, safe, either- you can easily get a sunburn driving, even with the windows up!

 

What makes sun exposure so dangerous is the ultraviolet light the sun emits. This radiation has gotten worse in recent years due to the weakening of the ozone layer, which acts as a filter between the sun and these ultraviolet rays. Unfortunately, as the ozone layer depletes, more ultraviolet light gets through, increasing the harmful effects of the sun on our skin. This light damages the fibers of our skin, which are known as ‘elastin.’ Elastin is what makes our skin ‘bounce back’ when we pinch or pull it. When we lose elastin, our skin begins to lose its elasticity, causing it stretch and sag. It can also cause the skin to bruise and tear more easily, making it take longer to heal cuts and scrapes. What’s more, exposure to these dangerous ultraviolet rays can also cause everything from sun spots, to premature wrinkles, to melanoma - the most fatal form of skin cancer.

You’ve probably heard about melanoma in the news a lot in recent years because cases of melanoma are on the incline- and though melanoma only accounts for less than 1% of all skin cancers, it is responsible for 75% of all skin cancer deaths. In fact, one person dies from Melanoma every 52 minutes in the United States - that’s about 28 people a day! Melanoma is difficult to keep under control, left untreated, it can spread throughout the body to other organs, which is why early detection is key. For those who are fortunate enough to survive melanoma, most are left with considerable scarring, because most of the time melanoma must be physically removed from the body by cutting the melanoma out of the skin, along with some of the surrounding, healthy skin and tissue.

So, what can you do to protect your skin from the sun? First of all, protect yourself in the sun, year-round. Don’t think that just because it’s winter, you can’t get a sunburn or that because it’s cold outside the sun’s UV rays aren’t dangerous.  For those who participate in winter sports like skiing, snowboarding or snowshoeing, be especially wary of the sun’s rays, as they are often actually more dangerous during the winter thanks to the light reflecting off the snow. This is because snow can reflect almost 90% of UV radiation, increasing the risk of burning on areas like your chin and nose. Also, if you’re at a higher elevation, like the top of a mountain, the air is thinner, which means you are exposed to more radiation than you might be at a lower elevation. Even just a quick trip to work, the grocery store, or to run to your mailbox exposes your skin to UV radiation- which is why we recommend you use a broad-spectrum sunscreen or sunblock, such as Zo Skin Health's Oclipse C Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF50 year round.  The abbreviation SPF means "sun protection factor"- or more specifically, protection from the specific UVB rays that cause your skin to sunburn. The numbers associated with different SPF’s describe how many times more protected your skin is than if you are wearing no sun protection at all. So, for example, when you apply an SPF 15 sunblock, your skin is 15 times more protected than it would be with no sunscreen and will take 15 times longer to burn. So if it normally takes you 15 minutes of sun exposure before you burn, an SPF 15 will provide you 225 minutes of protection before needing to be reapplied (and yes, you do need to reapply! Another big difference between sunscreens are the differences in normal vs. broad spectrum sunscreens. Broad spectrum means that your sunscreen protects you from both UVA and UVB rays.  Most sunscreens only protect against UVB rays, which are the ones that cause sunburn, but UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin, damaging tissue and eventually causing wrinkles.

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Coping with Post-Cosmetic Surgery Depression

Coping with Post-Cosmetic Surgery Depression

For many patients, cosmetic surgery is something they’ve looked forward to for years. Whether they’re removing a much-despised bump in the nose, want larger breasts, or are ready for a full facelift, cosmetic procedures offer patients hope that they can finally look on the outside the way they feel on the inside. But many patients are surprised when, following their procedure, they are left feeling hopeless and depressed. Post-surgical depression is real, and it happens more often than you might think. Learn the triggers of this type of depression, the warning signs to look for following your procedure, and what to do if you think you are experiencing post-surgical depression.

 

While nobody knows exactly what causes post-surgical depression, there are many triggers. Anything from anesthesia to unrealistic expectations to isolation or lack of support network can all be huge contributors to a patient feeling depressed following what should be a time of renewed hope. Worse yet, many people are ashamed to come forward and discuss their feelings because of the stigma associated with depression- and the shame they feel for experiencing depression following an elective surgery.

Before we get into what to look for, though, there are some depression risk indicators patients should be aware of prior to their surgery. If you fall into any of these categories, be honest with yourself and with your surgeon. Often, discussing these risks ahead of time can help alleviate them- or at least allow you and your doctor to form a plan in case you do begin to experience signs of depression following your surgery.

-If you have unrealistic expectations for your surgical results, you may be headed for disappointment if the procedure doesn’t live up to your expectations. Your surgeon will do his or her best to explain the possible side effects and give you a realistic idea of what to expect - but it is understandably difficult for patients to imagine what they’ll see in the mirror following their surgery. Another issue some patients have following surgery is that the healing process can often take much longer than expected. Depending on the procedure, you may not be able to see your final results for a year or longer. This is especially true with rhinoplasties because the swelling of the nose takes a very long time to go down. Even then it is a gradual process, so patients may not realize it has reduced in size for months- or that it still needs, even more, time to progess.

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Younger Patients Seeking Cosmetic Procedures

Younger Patients Seeking Cosmetic Procedures

Recent data from two unrelated studies have revealed that the age of patients receiving cosmetic procedures is decreasing as the popularity of these procedures is increasing. Available for cosmetic use since 2002, Botox injections have long been marketed to women between the ages of 45 to 54. Not surprisingly, that marketing is working, with a full 60% of patients fall into the 45-54 age group. However, surprising new data has revealed that the facial plastic surgery category is undergoing a bit of a facelift of its own, as more women in their 40’s have begun to abandon the old standbys of Botox and fillers in favor of surgical procedures like facelifts. Even more surprising? Fillers and Botox sales aren’t suffering any losses due to this exodus because a new crop of women in their 20’s and 30’s are turning to injectables to stave off the aging process.

 

A recent 10-year study entitled "Nonsurgical Facial Rejuvenation Procedures in Patients Under 50 Prior to Undergoing Facelift: Habits, Costs, and Results," found that despite the widespread availability of fillers and Botox, patients are opting to have full facelifts at younger ages than ever before. One plastic surgeon who isn’t surprised by these findings is Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, NV. "Many of the patients in this particular study were already using Botox and fillers for years prior to their surgical procedures. What happened in many cases is that these patients were seeking greater results than they were getting with injectables alone." Explains Mitchell, "So, whereas an injectable filler might knock a few years off your appearance, a facelift can easily take off a decade or more."

So, why go through the expense and hassle of injectables in the first place? Mitchell believes there are several factors at play here. "First and foremost," he says, "many of these patients probably didn’t feel they needed a face lift when they began using injectables. Beyond that, a lot happened to normalize plastic surgery in the past few decades. The prices on some of these procedures have dropped, more surgical options have become available, more women are earning and controlling their own finances, plastic surgery has become more acceptable in society- it could be any one or all of these variables."

So what was stopping patients from just skipping ahead straight to the facelift? Well, for starters, they probably never felt as though they needed it. Botox, for example, has been long touted as a preventative measure for aging. While it won’t prevent wrinkles entirely, it can slow their arrival, and reduce their severity when they finally do appear. In fact, studies done on twins where one sibling used Botox and the other did not show dramatic differences between the treated and untreated twin- even after the effects of Botox had completely worn off. The treated twin still showed some signs of aging, but those wrinkles appeared softer and shallower than those on the untreated twin.

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Are The Newest Breast Implants Worth the Expense?

Are The Newest Breast Implants Worth the Expense?

Breast implant surgery is the number one plastic surgery procedure in the US year after year. But while this procedure is popular with patients from all walks of life, one size fits all definitely does not apply. Today, there are more implant options than ever before- but more options aren’t always better. We spoke to plastic surgeon Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, NV about the differences in breast implants- and how those differences really affect your results.

 

It used to be that if you wanted breast implants, you’d go to a plastic surgeon and your biggest choice would literally be what cup size you wanted to be. Silicone implants were the first kind of implants to be developed in 1961. They debuted on the consumer market in 1963. For a year, they were the only game in town, until saline implants were introduced to consumers in 1964. Since then, not much has changed in the world of implants- until recently, that is. Today, there are more options than ever when it comes to choosing your breast implant style, but not all implants are created equal, says Mitchell.

One such implant innovation is the addition of so-called ‘natural-shaped’ implants, which are teardrop shaped, unlike the traditional round implants that have been used for decades. These naturally shaped implants are touted as being noticeably different from the round implants, however, according to a recent study by the IMED Hospital Department of Plastic Surgery, in Valencia, Spain, even plastic surgeons and nurses cannot tell the difference once the surgery is complete. In the study, doctors and surgical nurses were asked to view before and after photos of patients with round implants, and those with teardrop-shaped implants. Surgeons did slightly better- guessing correctly about 50% of the time. However, the doctors’ correct guesses were based more on what kind of implant would have been recommended based on the client’s ‘before’ photos than their actual after photos.

According to Mitchell, this is actually good news for patients, because along with their shape, teardrop implants come at an additional cost. Says Mitchell "The results of the study should be a relief to patients hesitant to spend the extra money to get a more natural shaped implant- because they’ll get the same natural appearance by spending less on round implants."

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Should I Get Plastic Surgery?

If you are considering plastic surgery, you’ve likely got a long list of questions for your surgeon- but there are a few you should be asking yourself, too. If you think you’re ready to take the plunge and get that cosmetic procedure you’ve been dreaming of, Dr. Ryan Mitchell wants to know- have you asked yourself these questions:

Why do you want plastic surgery?

Seems like a pretty obvious question, right? But it’s the first question you should be asking yourself when considering any procedure. You know which procedure you’re considering, but do you know WHY you want it? Do you truly believe your breast size is ‘too small?’ Do you think your confidence would improve if you removed the bump in your nose? Or, is someone else telling you that you’d be more attractive if you’d make these improvements. Your surgical outcome will only be as positive as you make it. If you are being pressured into surgery and it’s not what you actually want, you will most likely not be happy with the results. If you think fixing your problem areas is a magic cure for your problems, you are setting yourself up for unrealistic results- and potentially a big letdown. Ultimately, knowing why you want surgery is just as important as knowing where you want surgery- and genuinely wanting it for the right reasons makes all the difference.

 

Can you afford plastic surgery?

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More Americans Getting Belly Button Surgery

More Americans Getting Belly Button Surgery

Posted by kiki on Friday, 23 December 2016 in Upper Face

If you’re one of the 4% of people with an "outie" belly button, you’re a rarity. But if that distinction isn’t exactly something you’re proud of, there’s help! Did you know there’s a plastic surgery procedure called an "umbilicoplasty" that can actually transform your outie to an "innie?" Dr. Ryan Mitchell discusses the ‘in’s and out’s’ of correcting your belly button.

Though genetics can play a role in whether you have an innie or outie belly button, you’re not actually born with your belly button. That’s because it’s created when your umbilical cord detaches and falls off your body- making your belly button essentially a scar. Besides genetics, there are a few other factors that can determine whether a belly button is convex or concave- the after-care of your umbilical cord is one, and the presence of an umbilical hernia is another. In some cases, a person can be born with an innie, and it pops out later due to weight gain or pregnancy. Unfortunately, once your belly button becomes an outie, it won’t ‘go back in’ on its own.

 

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Vaping Could Negatively Affect Plastic Surgery Results

Vaping Could Negatively Affect Plastic Surgery Results

Before you undergo any surgical procedure, your doctor will no doubt give you a list of pre-op instructions that you must follow for a successful surgical outcome. You may be required to do things like fast for 12 hours prior to surgery, stop taking certain medications, and if you’re a smoker, stop smoking cigarettes for at least four weeks prior to your surgical procedure. The reason patients are asked to stop smoking is because the nicotine found in cigarettes has been found to restrict blood flow, endangering the healing process. But while E-cigarettes have been touted as the safer alternative to traditional cigarettes, new research published in the December issue of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons official medical journal, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery has found that smoking e-cigarettes or ‘vaping’ may have the same negative effects on healing as traditional cigarettes. We spoke to Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, NV about these new guidelines.

 

So, why do surgeons recommend temporarily quitting smoking for four weeks prior to surgery? According to Mitchell, it's due to a very specific problem known as a ‘skin flap’ complication. "A skin flap complication occurs when the nicotine in your bloodstream constricts the blood vessels that are needed to keep your ‘lifted’ skin alive during the healing process. This constriction causes a reduction in blood flow that is known as vasoconstriction," explains Mitchell. Vasoconstriction can not only slow the healing process, but it can also kill the skin, which could turn it black and cause it to fall off, leaving behind significant permanent scars.

But while the dangers of vasoconstriction have been widely known by plastic surgeons for many years, these recent revelations about e-cigarettes may come as a surprise to smokers who consider vaping the safer alternative to smoking. Though vaping doesn’t cause the same damage to lungs as the smoke in traditional cigarettes, their danger lies in fluid ‘vaporized’ in the e-cigarette itself, which contains nicotine. It is because of their nicotine content that plastic surgeons are now recommending those patients who vape follow the same pre-op cessation guidelines as smokers of traditional cigarettes. This comes on the heels of another study by the University of Rochester Medical Center which found that the nicotine in e-cigarette fluid was just as bad for the teeth and cells of the mouth as smoking traditional cigarettes.

As for the recommendation to simply stop smoking for a month, Mitchell understands what a tall order this is. He recommends patients begin reducing their reliance on nicotine products as soon as they think they want a plastic surgery procedure. Says Mitchell "You shouldn’t be smoking in any case, but if you really don’t want to quit for good, at least try to reduce your dependence as soon as you can so you don’t have to deal with the stress of quitting cold turkey." As for patients who think they can get through those four long weeks with nicotine patches or gum, Mitchell says 'think again.' "Because the problem is with the nicotine itself, nicotine patches or gum can cause the same vasoconstriction as smoking or vaping." However, says Mitchell, "One of the benefits of quitting for four weeks is that some patients can quit smoking completely in that time - and never go back following their procedure. The benefits to this are myriad- because not only are you improving your overall health, you’re reducing your risks of premature aging caused by smoking, making your plastic surgery results look better, longer."

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Beyond the Bulge

Beyond the Bulge

The tummy tuck is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures performed in the United States each year. For most tummy tuck patients, the decision to go under the knife is usually motivated by the desire to improve their appearance. While the aesthetic benefits of the procedure, like improved appearance and reduction in the waistline, are already pretty well known, having a tummy tuck can also provide significant medical benefits, too. These medical benefits often aren't mentioned, but there’s no reason why you can’t kill two birds with one stone, right? Tummy tucks are a very popular procedure performed by Dr. Mitchell each year.

 

One major, but often overlooked, medical benefit to a tummy tuck is the reduction of stress urinary incontinence, also known as SUI. Stress urinary incontinence can occur as a result of pregnancy and vaginal delivery. Both of these things put a significant amount of pressure on the bladder. As a result, leakage can occur when you sneeze, cough, or laugh. Some patients even report leakage when exercising or running. During the tummy tuck procedure, doctors can make a slight obstruction of the bladder using your soft tissue, and this helps to relieve incontinence.

Hernia correction is another under-reported medical benefit of tummy tucks. Ventral hernias, in which the intestines break through the abdominal wall, occur as a result of weak abdominal muscles or because of abdominal surgeries, like C-sections. Hernia repair is often done in conjunction with a tummy tuck to reduce the patient's need for another separate surgery.

Your posture can also be improved as a result of the surgery. Weak abdominal muscles cause posture problems. The most common of these conditions is known as swayback. Lower back problems also result from a weak core. When abdominal muscles are tightened as part of the procedure, they can better support the body and the spine. Patients notice new, improved posture and may experience a reduction in back pain.

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Millennials are showing off Their Plastic Surgery Procedures on Social Media

Millennials are showing off Their Plastic Surgery Procedures on Social Media

Posted by Ryan on Friday, 18 November 2016 in Upper Face

With the rise of social media networks like Instagram and Snapchat, more and more millennials are sharing intimate details of their lives through photography on social media. Surprisingly, some of those details include their plastic surgery. We spoke to Dr. Ryan Mitchell a plastic surgeon from Henderson, NV about this rising trend- and what it might mean for plastic surgery’s image.

With popular plastic surgery themed TV shows like "Botched" and popular celebrities posting photos of their enhanced faces and bodies to millions of followers, it was only a matter of time before non-celebrities started following suit. Posting before and after shots of themselves, sharing waiting or exam room ‘selfies,' and even ‘during’ shots for some minimally invasive procedures. Plastic surgeons like Mitchell believe that these social media posts are actually helping to normalize plastic surgery- a topic that used to be taboo in years past.

 

"If you think about ten or fifteen years ago, nobody admitted to having plastic surgery, or even fillers. You’d see an interview with a popular celebrity who looked very different, and it went from ‘I’d never’ to ‘I don’t know what the future holds’ to celebrities like Kylie Jenner admitting to having her lips filled. And lip filler sales increasing by 27% last year alone," Says Dr. Mitchell. "Fittingly, they refer to this as the ‘Kardashian effect."

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3D Models Will Help Patients Envision Changes

3D Models Will Help Patients Envision Changes

Posted by Ryan on Friday, 18 November 2016 in Upper Face

One of the things patients considering plastic surgery are most nervous about besides the surgery itself is the results they’ll achieve from their surgery. If you’re used to looking in the mirror and seeing the same person every day, it’s difficult to envision yourself looking different than what you’ve seen your entire life. But while computer programs have been designed to give patients a preview of what they can expect from their surgery, wouldn’t it be nice to not just see the results, but touch them and look at them in three-dimensional form? While in the past it would have been bothtime and cost prohibitive for surgeons to hand create 3D models of each patient’s anticipated results, a new technology called 3D printing is changing that. We spoke to Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, NV about what the future of plastic surgery will look like.

 

You may have heard about three-dimensional (3D) printing in the news a lot over the past few years. 3D printing (also referred to as additive manufacturing, or AM) is the process of using thin layers of plastics to create a three-dimensional, physical object from a 3D digital model. 3D printing has been used to make everything from toys to medical devices to weapons and architectural prototypes- and with the price of 3D printers rapidly decreasing, more and more consumers are using them for a variety of creative endeavors, too. With all these innovative uses for these devices, it was only a matter of time before 3D printing made it to the plastic surgery space.

Currently being tested in only one or two practices around the world, 3D printed models have already helped plastic surgeons show patients what they can expect from their surgery. Mitchell thinks using 3D printing technology in plastic surgery is an inevitable step. "3D printing will enable the patient to better understand their options. Sometimes it’s hard for patients to see slight variations in results when presented with 2D images on a computer screen. 3D printing will allow the surgeon to print several models at once so the patient can do a side by side comparison and really see and feel the differences between each option, and choose which one they like best." According to Mitchell, once a model is selected, the surgeon can then bring that model with them to the operating room and use it as a three-dimensional guide. "Ultimately," says Mitchell "we want patients to be happy with the results of their surgery. 3D printing will help doctors give patients realistic expectations, so there are no surprises post-surgery, and hopefully, no regrets."

The Eyes Have It Millennials are showing off Their Plastic Surgery ...
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The Eyes Have It

The Eyes Have It

It is a story we hear over and over again among friends. That feature-packed new phone with the improved HD camera sounded great – until you used it to take a "selfie" and realized just how heavy your eyelids have become, or how deep the "crow’s feet" around your eyes have gotten. Just like the HD video camera created a world of new insecurities for TV personalities everywhere, so too will the HD smartphone camera on your new phone.

But don’t fret- it causes wrinkles! Besides, there are some quick, temporary fixes to these insecurities- as well as some not as quick but permanent fixes, too. We spoke to plastic surgeon Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Contours & Curves in Henderson, NV about some options.

 

The quickest and easiest way to correct the fine lines around the eyes is the use of products like Botox, which relax the muscles around the eyes- making the lines go away. However, this solution is not permanent, and the injections will need to be repeated every 3-4 months to maintain results. Another injectable that can be used around the eyes is hyaluronic acid, or (HA) that actually ‘fills in’ the lines around the eyes. Hyaluronic Acid is also only temporary and must be repeated every six months or so. It is available under brand names like Belotero and Restylane.

Another option is laser resurfacing, which can be done in many plastic surgeons offices. This procedure generally takes about an hour, and chemically exfoliates the top layers of dead skin off your face, revealing the newer, firmer skin below. You can expect some swelling and down time with peels, but once the swelling goes down, the changes are very noticeable- but also not permanent.

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Excess Skin After Weight Loss

Excess Skin After Weight Loss

Losing weight is supposed to be a time of celebration and relief. The hours you've spent exercising, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, the donuts you avoided in the breakroom, and cutting down those glasses of wine in the evening, it's all hard work! What should be a time to be proud of your hard work can often become filled with frustration and insecurity. Gaining and losing weight are both emotional journeys. Motivation to lose weight may stem from the desire to live a longer and healthier life. But let's face it, we want to look good too! We spoke to Dr. Ryan Mitchell of Henderson, NV about the best ways to embrace your post-weight loss body.

 

What many people don’t realize before embarking on a weight loss journey is that after the weight is gone, there can still be reminders of their old body left behind, in the form of excess skin. Mitchell says "When we gain a lot of weight, our skin must stretch to accommodate the excess body fat. This is why we get those annoying stretch marks. When we lose excess weight, that skin is still there. If it has been stretched enough, it will hang from the body in the areas where the body stored the most excess body fat before your weight loss." Sometimes weight gain and then the loss can be the result of pregnancy. This may cause loose skin in the abdomen area that no amount of situps can help.

So what can be done about this excess skin? Mitchell says there are a few options, depending on how much excess skin you have. "If you lose 20 pounds or less, you can most likely tone up problem areas with simple targeted weight training exercises." This may not completely tighten excess skin, but it could reduce the appearance of loose skin. Tightening up any remaining loose skin and cellulite with laser skin tightening is another option. Laser skin tightening works by heating the skin tissue. This tells the body to make new collagen, which reforms firmer and tighter. But while this minimally invasive procedure is very helpful with small amounts of excess skin, it won’t do very much for excess skin due to major weight loss.

For those more dramatic losses, especially following a weight loss surgery, Mitchell says non-invasive procedures may not be enough. "For a weight loss of over 30 pounds, it may be very difficult to reduce excess skin with exercise or lasers alone- especially in older adults." For individuals in this situation, an option may be body contouring surgery, which will remove the excess skin left behind after weight loss, leaving you with a more toned looking body. Procedures like breast lifts, abdominoplasty, thigh lift, arm lift, and buttock lifts target this excess skin and remove it. Every body is different, and every person has different goals and desired outcomes. A consultation with a plastic surgeon can help you decide what surgeries are best for you and what results you can expect. Mitchell says "Losing weight isn’t easy. You deserve to be proud of your weight loss results." Part of that is going the extra mile to tone up the last areas of excess skin.

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